Andrew Clark plays basketball in the atrium of the Woodward's building on a mural placed on the ground to mark World Sight Day, in Vancouver, B.C., on Tuesday October 17, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Andrew Clark plays basketball in the atrium of the Woodward's building on a mural placed on the ground to mark World Sight Day, in Vancouver, B.C., on ​​​​​​​Tuesday October 17, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Clearly #MakeVisionCount Optical Art for World Vision Day 2017
2.5 billion people live globally with vision problems and can’t afford optical solutions. To raise awareness of the need for worldwide sight correction, Coastal and Clearly commissioned a mural from artists Sandy and Steve Pell. The two created a beautiful optical illusion art installation in Coastal’s home town of Vancouver, Canada. The company hopes the Coastal mural helps to spark conversation and raises public awareness surrounding vision impairment as a major international public health issue.
How do Sandy and Steve create their murals? 
Here's their simple process breakdown: 
We had the opportunity to create HUGE 14.4m (47’ 2⅞”) interactive floor mural for World Sight Day as a way of focusing global attention on blindness and vision impairment. We partnered with Clearly (AKA Clearly Contacts) to create this optical illusion in the Woodward's building in Vancouver, British Columbia. The large, complex artwork, which was created using a combination of Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Illustrator, was itself masterfully printed and installed by East Van Vinyl. It was a major challenge because the art is printed as long strips, so East Van Vinyl had to ensure that the intricate linework aligned across the entire space while laying down each row, not an easy thing to do with such precision. 
We’ve added a few images here to share our process which shows you the basic grid construction and colour which Steve creates as well as the detailed line work that Sandy illustrates, using Steve's grid system as the basis for the linework.
Install has been successful. There have been a number of photos shot from various angles of the artwork. The illusion of the artwork was situated facing the entrance of the building, so as you enter the building, it looks like a large hole in the floor.
Thanks for looking!

You may also like

Back to Top